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Every NFL team's best and worst free-agent signing ever

Sometimes free agent signings go as well as planned for NFL teams, while other times they're disastrous. Here's a look at each team's best and worst signing in NFL free agency history.

 
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Arizona Cardinals best: Kurt Warner, QB

Arizona Cardinals best: Kurt Warner, QB
Jonathan Daniel / Getty Images

It looked like Warner could be finished after a year with the Giants in 2004, settling on a one-year deal with the Cardinals. He wasn't much better in his next two seasons with Arizona. However, the former Rams MVP started to turn a corner in 2007 and led the team to a Super Bowl appearance the following year. After another good season in 2008, Warner retired from football.

 
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Arizona Cardinals worst: Emmitt Smith, RB

Arizona Cardinals worst: Emmitt Smith, RB
Mike Moore / Getty Images

nb游戏平台The NFL's all-time rushing leader ended out his career in an uneventful way, signing with Arizona in 2003 at age 34. He played only 25 games in two seasons with the Cardinals, averaging 3.3 yards per carry as a predictable bust.

 
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Atlanta Falcons best: Michael Turner, RB

Atlanta Falcons best: Michael Turner, RB
Tom Dahlin / Getty Images

After four seasons as a backup in San Diego, Turner signed with the Falcons and immediately became an elite running back. He was an All-Pro in his first season with 1,699 yards rushing and 17 touchdowns and went back to the Pro Bowl two years later. He had three 1,300-plus yard rushing seasons in five years with the team.

 
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Atlanta Falcons Worst: Peerless Price, WR

Atlanta Falcons Worst: Peerless Price, WR
Scott Halleran / Getty Images

Price had a breakout year at the right time with Buffalo in 2002, which netted him a seven-year, $37.5 million contract with Atlanta the following year. He only played two years with the Falcons, totaling just 109 receptions for 1,413 yard and six touchdowns during that time.

 
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Baltimore Ravens Best: Rod Woodson, DB

Baltimore Ravens Best: Rod Woodson, DB
Michael J. Minardi / Getty Images

Woodson had 10 seasons in Pittsburgh and one year in San Francisco, but he became a free agent in 1998 after the 49ers cut him. After signing in Baltimore, he helped complete one of the greatest defenses in league history. Woodson made four straight Pro Bowls and won Super Bowl XXXV in 2000-01 with the team.

 
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Baltimore Ravens worst: Elvis Grbac, QB

Baltimore Ravens worst: Elvis Grbac, QB
Doug Pensinger / Getty Images

Attempting to improve their passing game in 2001 despite winning the Super Bowl with Trent Dilfer, the Ravens signed Grbac to a five-year, $30 million contract. He went 8-6 in 14 starts, throwing more interceptions than touchdowns, and was released after only one season.

 
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Buffalo Bills best: Bryce Paup, LB

Buffalo Bills best: Bryce Paup, LB
Robert Sullivan / AFP / Getty Images

Few free agent signings in history got better immediate returns than Buffalo's signing of Paup in 1995. He recorded a league-high 17.5 sacks in his first season with the Bills, winning Defensive Player of the Year after five years in Green Bay. Paup had a total of 33 sacks in three seasons with the team.

 
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Buffalo Bills worst: Langston Walker, OT

Buffalo Bills worst: Langston Walker, OT
Al Bello / Getty Images

nb游戏平台Walker came over from Oakland on a five-year, $25 million contract, but the massive offensive lineman was a massive bust. He lasted only two seasons with the team before getting released.

 
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Carolina Panthers best: Jake Delhomme, QB

Carolina Panthers best: Jake Delhomme, QB
Nick Laham / Getty Images

nb游戏平台Delhomme signed with Carolina in 2003 and soon took over for Rodney Peete. He was the organization's starter for the next seven seasons, going 53-37 and appearing in one Super Bowl. While he was rarely spectacular, Delhomme made one Pro Bowl and was a solid starter.

 
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Carolina Panthers worst: Chuck Smith, DE

Carolina Panthers worst: Chuck Smith, DE
Craig Jones / Getty Images

nb游戏平台Smith left Atlanta for Carolina after eight productive seasons. However, he managed to play only two games due to knee problems in 2000, putting an end to his career. The Panthers got almost nothing from their five-year, $21 million contract.

 
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Chicago Bears best: Julius Peppers, DE

Chicago Bears best: Julius Peppers, DE
Jonathan Daniel / Getty Images

Peppers was one of the best pass rushers of his era and a steal for the Bears in 2010 despite a lucrative six-year, $91.5 million contract. During four seasons with Chicago, he made three Pro Bowls and recorded 37.5 sacks.

 
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Chicago Bears worst: Mike Glennon, QB

Chicago Bears worst: Mike Glennon, QB
Benny Sieu / USA Today Sports Images

The Glennon era in Chicago was short-lived after he signed in 2017. Glennon signed a three-year, $45 million contract before the Bears drafted Mitchell Trubisky second overall, and the former Buccaneers quarterback was sent to the bench after only four games.

 
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Cincinnati Bengals best: Adam Jones, CB

Cincinnati Bengals best: Adam Jones, CB
David Kohl / USA Today Sports Images

The Bengals stayed true to their reputation of taking players with off-field problems when they signed Jones in 2010 after a year away from the league. The former first-round pick was able to rehabilitate his career in eight seasons with Cincinnati, being named All-Pro in 2014 and also contributing as a kick returner.

 
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Cincinnati Bengals worst: Antonio Bryant, WR

Cincinnati Bengals worst: Antonio Bryant, WR
Handout / Getty Images

Coming off an injury-plagued season in Tampa Bay, Bryant still signed a four-year, $28 million contract with the Bengals in 2010. He never even made it out of the preseason due to knee issues and was released before Week 1.

 
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Cleveland Browns best: Frank Minnifield, CB

Cleveland Browns best: Frank Minnifield, CB
George Gojkovich / Getty Images

nb游戏平台Minnifield became a free agent after two years in the USFL and signed with Cleveland in 1984. He made four Pro Bowls in his nine-year career and was one of the best cornerbacks of his era.

 
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Cleveland Browns worst: Jeff Garcia, QB

Cleveland Browns worst: Jeff Garcia, QB
David Maxwell / Getty Images

Garcia was a late bloomer who made the most of his ability in the NFL, but like many quarterbacks, he failed in Cleveland. He signed a four-year, $25 million contract with the Browns in 2004 but lasted only one season, going 3-7 in 10 starts.

 
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Dallas Cowboys Best: Deion Sanders, CB

Dallas Cowboys Best: Deion Sanders, CB
John Ruthroff / AFP / Getty Images

After winning a Super Bowl with the rival 49ers in 1994, Sanders signed a seven-year contract with Dallas in 1995. "Prime Time" would end up spending only five of those years with the Cowboys but was an All-Pro three times and made four Pro Bowls. Dallas won a Super Bowl in his first season.

 
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Dallas Cowboys worst: Mike Vanderjagt, K

Dallas Cowboys worst: Mike Vanderjagt, K
Ronald Martinez / Getty Images

Vanderjagt was a top kicker for much of his eight seasons with the Colts, but he left partially due to past comments in the media and criticism of quarterback Peyton Manning. He went to Dallas on a three-year, $4.5 million contract in 2006. He struggled from the beginning of his time in Dallas and made only 13 of 18 field-goal attempts in 10 games with the team.

 
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Denver Broncos best: Peyton Manning, QB

Denver Broncos best: Peyton Manning, QB
Robert Hanashiro / USA Today Sports Images

The 2012 NFL offseason was also the Peyton Manning sweepstakes, as the elite quarterback went looking for a new team after sitting out the 2011 season with a neck injury. Manning put up spectacular numbers in his first three seasons with the Broncos, including a record-breaking 2013 season, but his one Super Bowl victory with the franchise came in an injury-plagued 2015 season as a result of Denver's elite defense.

 
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Denver Broncos worst: Dale Carter, CB

Denver Broncos worst: Dale Carter, CB
Harry How / Getty Images

A shutdown cornerback in his first seven seasons with the Chiefs, Carter signed a four-year, $22 million contract with the rival Broncos in 1999. He had a solid first season in Denver but was suspended for all of 2000 for violating the NFL's substance abuse policy before getting released.

 
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Detroit Lions best: Dre Bly, CB

Detroit Lions best: Dre Bly, CB
George Gojkovich / Getty Images

Bly left St. Louis after four seasons to sign with the Lions, led by GM Matt Millen. It was one of the few acclaimed moves during Millen's tenure, as Bly managed to make two Pro Bowls in four seasons with the team while also picking off 19 passes.

 
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Detroit Lions worst: Scott Mitchell, QB

Detroit Lions worst: Scott Mitchell, QB
Jamie Squire / Getty Images

The Lions struggled to find success during the Barry Sandersnb游戏平台 and Herman Moore years, and many fans still blame Mitchell. He came over from Miami in 1994 on a three-year, $11 million contract. During five seasons with the Lions, Mitchell went 27-30 as a starter in the regular season and 0-2 in the playoffs. He left Detroit having thrown 57 picks and completing less than 57 percent of his passes.

 
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Green Bay Packers best: Reggie White, DE

Green Bay Packers best: Reggie White, DE
Don Emmert / AFP / Getty Images

White was already an elite top defensive lineman in football when he left Philadelphia to sign a four-year contract with Green Bay in 1993. He recorded 68.5 sacks over six seasons with the Packers, winning 1998 Defensive Player of the Year and one Super Bowl.

 
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Green Bay Packers worst: Joe Johnson, DE

Green Bay Packers worst: Joe Johnson, DE
Jonathan Daniel / Getty Images

nb游戏平台Johnson had 21 sacks in two seasons with New Orleans before signing a six-year, $33 million contract with the Packers in 2002. He played only 11 games in two seasons with the Pack due to injury before effectively calling it quits.

 
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Houston Texans best: Johnathan Joseph, CB

Houston Texans best: Johnathan Joseph, CB
Troy Taormina / USA Today Sports Images

Joseph departed Cincinnati after five seasons and signed a huge five-year, $48.75 million contract with Houston in 2011. He proved worth the big sum immediately, making the Pro Bowl in his first two seasons with the Texans. Joseph has been a staple for the Texans defense ever since, playing his eighth straight season with the team in 2018.

 
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Houston Texans worst: Brock Osweiler, QB

Houston Texans worst: Brock Osweiler, QB
Isaiah J. Downing / USA Today Sports Images

nb游戏平台Osweiler left the Broncos to sign a four-year, $72 million contract with Houston in 2016. The contract was a complete disaster, as Osweiler threw more interceptions (16) than touchdowns (15) in his one season with the Texans and was traded to Cleveland the following offseason in a salary dump that cost Houston a second-round pick.

 
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Indianapolis Colts Best: Adam Vinatieri, K

Indianapolis Colts Best: Adam Vinatieri, K
Thomas J. Russo / USA Today Sports Images

The Colts replaced Mike Vanderjagt with Vinatieri in 2006, and the results couldn't have been more favorable. The former Super Bowl hero in New England won his fourth Super Bowl in his first year with the Colts. He's still going strong through his age 46 season, making 86 percent of his field goals over 13 years with Indy.

 
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Indianapolis Colts worst: Andre Johnson, WR

Indianapolis Colts worst: Andre Johnson, WR
Troy Taormina / USA Today Sports Images

Already a likely Hall of Famer after his time in Houston, Johnson signed a three-year, $21 million contract with the rival Colts in 2015. He proved to have little left in the tank, with only 41 receptions for 503 yards in one year with the team.

 
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Jacksonville Jaguars best: Keenan McCardell, WR

Jacksonville Jaguars best: Keenan McCardell, WR
Eliot J. Schechter / Getty Images

Jacksonville signed McCardell to a lucrative contract in only its second season as a franchise, and it turned out to be a perfect fit. McCardell had his first 1,000 yard season in 1996 and would surpass that mark four times in his six years with the Jaguars.

 
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Jacksonville Jaguars worst: Jerry Porter, WR

Jacksonville Jaguars worst: Jerry Porter, WR
Sam Greenwood / Getty Images

nb游戏平台Porter signed a six-year, $30 million contract at age 30 with Jacksonville in 2008. He contributed little for the Jags, with only 11 receptions in 10 games during 2008. He was released following the season and never played again.

 
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Kansas City Chiefs best: Priest Holmes, RB

Kansas City Chiefs best: Priest Holmes, RB
Ronald Martinez / Getty Images

After winning Super Bowl XXXV in Baltimore as Jamal Lewis' backup, Holmes signed with the Chiefs in 2001. He was expected to fight for snaps in the revitalized offense under head coach Dick Vermeil but turned into a superstar almost immediately. His first three seasons in Kansas City rank among the best ever by an NFL running back, as he gained more than 2,100 yards from scrimmage in each season with a total of 61 touchdowns. Holmes was voted the 2002 Offensive Player of the Year. 

 
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Kansas City Chiefs worst: Chester McGlockton, DT

Kansas City Chiefs worst: Chester McGlockton, DT
MediaNews Group / Getty Images

The Chiefs signed McGlockton away from the rival Raiders in 1998 on a five-year, $30 million contract after he made four straight Pro Bowls in Oakland. He was a bust for K.C. in three seasons, recording a total of seven sacks after accumulating at least that amount in the four seasons leading up to his arrival.

 
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Los Angeles Chargers best: Donnie Edwards, LB

Los Angeles Chargers best: Donnie Edwards, LB
Al Messerschmidt / Getty Images

nb游戏平台The speedy Edwards signed with the Chargers in 2002 after six seasons in Kansas City and remained one of the top tacklers in the league. He made the Pro Bowl in his first season in San Diego and had well over 100 tackles in all five of his years with the Chargers.

 
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Los Angeles Chargers worst: David Boston, WR

Los Angeles Chargers worst: David Boston, WR
Stephen Dunn / Getty Images

nb游戏平台Boston signed a seven-year, $47 million contract with the Chargers in 2003, just one year removed from leading the NFL in receiving. He clashed with San Diego's staff, getting suspended one game, and was traded to Miami after only one season. The following year, Boston was suspended four games for steroids and suffered a season-ending knee injury.

 
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Los Angeles Rams best: Kurt Warner, QB

Los Angeles Rams best: Kurt Warner, QB
Focus on Sport / Getty Images

Warner agreed to a futures contract with the Rams in 1998 and became a backup quarterback for the team after playing in NFL Europe. He barely found the field in his first season but was forced into a starting role the following year after Trent Green suffered a season-ending knee injury in the preseason. The rest is history, as Warner went on to lead the Rams to the Super Bowl and win two MVP Awards in six seasons with the team.

 
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Los Angeles Rams worst: Drew Bennett, WR

Los Angeles Rams worst: Drew Bennett, WR
Dilip Vishwanat / Getty Images

The Rams offense was far removed from the historic offenses from years prior but looked to revamp after signing Bennett to a six-year, $30 million deal in 2007. St. Louis hoped he could match his breakout 2004 performance when he had 80 receptions for 1,247 yards and 11 touchdowns, but Bennett played only 15 games with 34 catches in two seasons.

 
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Miami Dolphins best: Cameron Wake, DE

Miami Dolphins best: Cameron Wake, DE
Steve Mitchell / USA Today Sports Images

Wake won the CFL's Most Outstanding Defensive Player Award twice before signing with Miami in 2009. He quickly became a star with the Dolphins, making five Pro Bowl appearances in 10 seasons as one of the league's top pass rushers.

 
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Miami Dolphins worst: Jake Grove, OC

Miami Dolphins worst: Jake Grove, OC
Rex Brown / Getty Images

Despite recent injuries, the Dolphins signed Grove to a five-year, $29 million contract in 2009 after leaving Oakland. He played only 12 games in one season with the team before his career ended due to more injuries.

 
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Minnesota Vikings best: Antoine Winfield, CB

Minnesota Vikings best: Antoine Winfield, CB
The Sporting News / Getty Images

nb游戏平台Winfield was rewarded for five solid years in Buffalo by signing a six-year, $35 million contract with the Vikings in 2004. He spent nine years with Minnesota, proving to be one of the top tackling cornerbacks in the league and making three straight Pro Bowls from 2008-2010.

 
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Minnesota Vikings Worst: Fred Smoot, CB

Minnesota Vikings Worst: Fred Smoot, CB
Tom Dahlin / Getty Images

The Vikings thought they could create an elite cornerback tandem when they signed Smoot in 2005 to pair with Antoine Winfieldnb游戏平台. He was given a six-year, $34 million contract but struggled in two seasons with Minnesota.

 
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New England Patriots best: Stephon Gilmore, CB

New England Patriots best: Stephon Gilmore, CB
Jasen Vinlove / USA Today Sports Images

nb游戏平台New England stole Gilmore away from the rival Bills with a five-year, $65 million contract in 2017. He was an All-Pro for the Pats in 2018 and 2019, and won Defensive Player of the Year in 2019.

 
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New England Patriots worst: Adalius Thomas, LB

New England Patriots worst: Adalius Thomas, LB
Elsa / Getty Images

Coming off an All-Pro, 11-sack season in Baltimore, Thomas signed a five-year, $35 million contract with the Patriots in 2007. He was productive in his first season but played only nine games the following year due to an injury and had a falling out with the team in 2009.

 
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New Orleans Saints best: Drew Brees, QB

New Orleans Saints best: Drew Brees, QB
Chuck Cook / USA Today Sports Images

Possibly the most significant free agent signing in the history of the NFL, Brees joined the Saints in 2006 as the team returned to New Orleans following Hurricane Katrina. Coming off a shoulder injury, Brees went from being a good quarterback in San Diego to an elite one under Sean Payton with the Saints. He's still going strong as a future Hall of Famer with 11 Pro Bowls.

 
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New Orleans Saints worst: Coby Fleener

New Orleans Saints worst: Coby Fleener
Chuck Cook / USA Today Sports Images

After the great success of tight ends Jimmy Graham and Ben Watson in New Orleans, Fleener seemed like a perfect fit for the Saints. He signed a five-year, $36 million contract in 2016 but had only 50 receptions for 631 yards in his first year and 22 catches in 2017.

 
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New York Giants best: Plaxico Burress, WR

New York Giants best: Plaxico Burress, WR
Brian Killian / Getty Images

Burress signed a lucrative six-year deal with the Giants in 2005 and immediately became the team's No. 1 receiver. Over four seasons, Burress had two 1,000-yard seasons and scored 33 touchdowns. He also won one Super Bowl with the team.

 
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New York Giants worst: LaVar Arrington, LB

New York Giants worst: LaVar Arrington, LB
Rich Gabrielson / Getty Images

nb游戏平台Two straight years of injuries and issues with the Washington coaching staff didn't stop the Giants from signing Arrington to a seven-year, $49 million contract in 2006. He played only six games before rupturing his Achilles and would never play football again.

 
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New York Jets best: Curtis Martin, RB

New York Jets best: Curtis Martin, RB
The Sporting News / Getty Images

Bill Parcellsnb游戏平台 coached Martin in New England during the running back's first two seasons and managed to bring him to the Jets in 1998. He rushed for more than 1,000 yards in seven straight seasons with the team and led the league with 1,697 yards rushing in 2004.

 
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New York Jets worst: Neil O'Donnell, QB

New York Jets worst: Neil O'Donnell, QB
Al Bello / Getty Images

nb游戏平台Fresh off a Super Bowl appearance with the Steelers, O'Donnell signed a five-year, $25 million contract with the Jets in 1996. He went 0-6 in an injury-plagued 1996 season but did improve to 8-6 in 14 starts with 17/7 TD/INT the following year. Still, the Jets decided to move on after only two years.

 
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Oakland Raiders best: Jim Plunkett, QB

Oakland Raiders best: Jim Plunkett, QB
Sylvia Allen / Getty Images

Plunkett revitalized his career with the Raiders after San Francisco released him in 1978. He spent two years as the Raiders backup but replaced the injured Dan Pastorini in 1980. Plunkett would go on to win 1980 Comeback Player of the Year and lead his team to two Super Bowl victories.

 
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Oakland Raiders worst: Kerry Collins, QB

Oakland Raiders worst: Kerry Collins, QB
Kirby Lee / Getty Images

Collins had some productive seasons in his 17-year career, but his two-year stay in Oakland was forgettable. He went 7-21 in two seasons after signing a three-year, $16.8 million contract in 2004. Collins completed less than 55 percent of his passes with the team.

 
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Philadelphia Eagles best: Nick Foles, QB

Philadelphia Eagles best: Nick Foles, QB
Matthew Emmons / USA Today Sports Images

Foles didn't play much with Philly, but it's hard to top a Super Bowl MVP. Philadelphia brought in Foles to back up second-year quarterback Carson Wentz in 2017. The move seemed somewhat inconsequential at the time, but it helped lead Philadelphia to its first-ever Super Bowl victory. 

 
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Philadelphia Eagles worst: DeMarco Murray, RB

Philadelphia Eagles worst: DeMarco Murray, RB
Bill Streicher / USA Today Sports Images

Eagles head coach Chip Kelly signed two running backs in Murray and Ryan Mathewsnb游戏平台 to lucrative deals in 2015 after trading LeSean McCoy. Murray's contract was worth $42 million over five seasons, but he proceeded to average only 3.6 yards per carry on 193 carries as a poor fit in the Philly offense. Murray was traded to Tennessee following the season.

 
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Pittsburgh Steelers best: James Harrison, LB

Pittsburgh Steelers best: James Harrison, LB
Justin K. Aller / Getty Images

nb游戏平台Harrison wasn't much of a prospect early in his career, going through stints with the Steelers, Ravens and Rhein Fire. He eventually went back to Pittsburgh in 2004 but didn't work his way into the lineup regularly until 2007. That season started a streak of five straight Pro Bowls, with Harrison winning the 2008 Defensive Player of the Year after recording 16 sacks. He became one of the best pass rushers of his era.

 
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Pittsburgh Steelers worst: Ladarius Green, TE

Pittsburgh Steelers worst: Ladarius Green, TE
David Kohl / USA Today Sports Images

Green signed a four-year, $20 million contract to replace Heath Miller as the Steelers starting tight end in 2016. He didn't appear in a game until November due to an ankle injury and managed to play only six games for the year. The tight end was out of the league following his release in 2017.

 
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San Francisco 49ers best: Justin Smith, DE

San Francisco 49ers best: Justin Smith, DE
Brian Bahr / Getty Images

Smith was a good player during his first seven seasons in Cincinnati and got even better after signing a massive six-year, $45 million deal with the 49ers in 2008. During his seven seasons in San Francisco, Smith made five Pro Bowls and a record 43.5 sacks while missing a total of two games. 

 
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San Francisco 49ers worst: Torrey Smith, WR

San Francisco 49ers worst: Torrey Smith, WR
Kelley L. Cox / USA Today Sports Images

nb游戏平台Smith became one of the premier speed receivers in football early in his career with Baltimore, netting him a five-year, $40 million contract with the 49ers in 2015. While he still averaged a league-high 20.1 yards per reception in his first season with San Francisco, Smith had only 33 catches and four scores. The following year he played only 12 games with 20 catches before getting cut.

 
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Seattle Seahawks best: Michael Bennett, DE

Seattle Seahawks best: Michael Bennett, DE
Joe Nicholson / USA Today Sports Images

nb游戏平台Bennett returned to the team that signed him out of the draft in 2013 on a one-year, $4.8 million deal after four seasons in Tampa Bay. He spent five years with Seattle, becoming an anchor on an elite defense with 39 sacks in five seasons. 

 
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Seattle Seahawks worst: Matt Flynn, QB

Seattle Seahawks worst: Matt Flynn, QB
Stephen Brashear / Getty Images

Flynn parlayed a spectacular Week 17 performance with the Packers in 2011 into a three-year, $26 million contract with the Seahawks. Despite the signing, Flynn never actually started a game for Seattle, getting beat out by third-round draft pick Russell Wilson in training camp. 

 
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Tampa Bay Buccaneers best: Simeon Rice, DE

Tampa Bay Buccaneers best: Simeon Rice, DE
Joe Robbins / Getty Images

Rice signed a huge five-year deal with Tampa Bay in 2001 after five seasons in Arizona. Already a great pass rusher, he took the Bucs defense to another level with 67.5 sacks and one Super Bowl victory in five seasons.

 
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Tampa Bay Buccaneers worst: Alvin Harper, WR

Tampa Bay Buccaneers worst: Alvin Harper, WR
Jed Jacobsohn / Getty Images

An elite deep threat opposite Michael Irvin in his first four seasons in Dallas, Harper signed a four-year, $10.6 million contract with the Bucs in 1995. He had 46 catches in his first season but struggled the following year before moving onto Washington. After averaging 20.0 yards per catch with the Cowboys, he had only 14.2 yards per reception with the Bucs.

 
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Tennessee Titans best: Warren Moon, QB

Tennessee Titans best: Warren Moon, QB
William R. Sallaz / Getty Images

After going undrafted in 1978, Moon became a star in the CFL with five consecutive Grey Cup victories. He entered the NFL in 1984, signing with the Oilers and eventually proving he could play in the league. He spent 10 years in Houston, leading the league in passing yards twice and winning the 1990 Offensive Player of the Year.

 
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Tennessee Titans worst: Yancey Thigpen, WR

Tennessee Titans worst: Yancey Thigpen, WR
Andy Lyons / Getty Images

The speedy Thigpen signed with the Oilers in 1998 after making the Pro Bowl in two of his previous three seasons with Pittsburgh. He was a complete bust after signing his five-year, $21 million contract, the biggest ever by a wideout at the time. He totaled 91 catches for 1,430 yards and nine touchdowns in three seasons with the team, though he did appear in the Super Bowl in 1999.

 
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Washington Redskins best: London Fletcher, LB

Washington Redskins best: London Fletcher, LB
Alex Trautwig / Getty Images

nb游戏平台The diminutive Fletcher was a key part of defenses in St. Louis and Buffalo, but arguably his best seasons came in his mid-30s after signing with Washington. One of the few big signings during the Daniel Snyder era that worked out, Fletch made four Pro Bowls in seven seasons with Washington.

 
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Washington Redskins worst: Albert Haynesworth, DT

Washington Redskins worst: Albert Haynesworth, DT
Diamond Images / Getty Images

Haynesworth is just one of numerous horrific signings by the Redskins (Dana Stubblefield, Deion Sanders, Adam Archuleta, Antwaan Randle Elnb游戏平台). He was a star defensive tackle with Tennessee before signing an epic seven-year, $100 million contract with Washington. The fit was never right with his new team on or off the field, and Haynesworth was eventually traded to New England after two seasons.

Seth Trachtman is a fantasy sports expert and diehard Kansas City Chiefs fan still hoping for a Super Bowl win during his lifetime. He doesn't often Tweet, but when he does, you can find him on Twitter .


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